Astroworld tragedy: Travis Scott, Drake, Apple and Live Nation hit with $750M lawsuit

Travis Scott, Drake and Live Nation have been hit with another lawsuit stemming from the tragic events that took place at Scott’s popular Astroworld music festival, Fox Business has learned. The lawsuit also names Apple, which live-streamed the concert.

The $750 million complaint filed in a Houston Civil Court by high-powered attorney Tony Buzbee on behalf of more than 125 fans – including the family of one of the deceased – alleges Scott and show organizers were negligent in their planning of the festival, which left 10 dead, including a 9-year-old boy.

The filing argues that security tasked with keeping the peace weren’t properly trained in crowd control and mitigation.

In the suit, Buzbee writes that 21-year-old Axel Acosta “was crushed by the incited, unruly and out-of-control crowd with such force that he could no longer breath [sic]” and went into cardiac arrest.

“When Axel collapsed, he was trampled by those fighting to prevent themselves from being crushed,” Buzbee states in the declaration. “As he lay there under a mass of humanity, dying, the music played and streamed on — for almost forty minutes.”

ASTROWORLD TRAGEDY: TRAVIS SCOTT, KYLIE JENNER ‘DEVASTATED,’ RAPPER IN ‘CONSTANT STATE OF SHOCK’: SOURCE

“Axel died that night on the muddy ground at a concert he attended for fun,” the suit reads in part.

Buzbee writes that while the $750 million judgment is justified, “No amount of money will ever make these Plaintiffs whole; no amount of money can restore human life.”

ASTROWORLD TRAGEDY: VICTIMS IDENTIFIED IN DEADLY HOUSTON MUSIC FESTIVAL

The damages sought in the case is made with the intent to “fix, help, or make up for the harms and losses suffered by these Plaintiffs—nothing more and nothing less,” the suit reads, adding, “The quantum sought includes sufficient punitive damages to punish and make an example of all involved in the streaming, promotion, organization and failed execution of the concert, and also to encourage those who engage in such activity in the future to do so with safety at the forefront, not just as an afterthought.”

In a statement to Fox Business on Tuesday, Buzbee said his law firm “intends to file another lawsuit in the coming days with another 100 named plaintiffs.”

“The Buzbee Law Firm today filed suit on behalf of more than 120 clients, including Axel Acosta. Axel was killed during the Astroworld concert,” the memorandum reads. “Note that the first defendant named in the 55-page petition is Apple Music. The Buzbee Law firm believes, based on its ongoing investigation, that Apple Music, Epic Records and many other corporations that stood to make millions from Astroworld will share legal blame in a court of law.”

All of the concertgoers who died were between ages 10 and 27. 

LIVE NATION FAILED ASTROWORLD CONCERTGOERS IN EFFORT TO ‘MAKE MONEY,’ ATTORNEY SAYS: LIVE UPDATES

County Judge Lina Hidalgo — the top elected official in Harris County, which includes Houston — had previously proposed a third-party probe that would look at the planning and execution of crowd control tactics at the festival, founded and headlined by the rap superstar.

The Harris County administrator will work with other city and county entities to review security, fire and other safety plans at the county-owned NRG Park, where the festival was held.

Travis Scott performs at day one of the Astroworld Music Festival at NRG Park on Friday, Nov. 5, 2021, in Houston. (Associated Press / AP Newsroom)

Just last week, personal injury attorney Ben Crump also announced a lawsuit on behalf of more than 100 Astroworld attendees – and described the harrowing ordeal at the sold-out festival of 50,000 people as “a failure of epic proportions.”

“This should have never, ever happened,” Crump said. “People were literally fighting for their lives just to get out of there. … This is a horrific story. … We have to get the answers. Nobody should ever die from going to a concert.”

100+ ASTROWORLD VICTIMS FILE LAWSUIT OVER TRAVIS SCOTT’S DEADLY FESTIVAL: ‘A FAILURE OF EPIC PROPORTIONS’

“This is a disaster that changed their lives forever,” he shared. “One thing is for certain. We will not let them get away with this. … We are going to make them have changes in the industry.”

As some of Crump’s clients tearfully spoke of the horrors they witnessed, the renowned attorney said his team will hold “each and every” person responsible accountable. One concertgoer described seeing “bodies everywhere” as well as a girl who “was for sure dead.”

Travis Scott (L) and Drake are named in a number of big money lawsuits stemming from the deadly events at Astroworld 2021. (Photo by Rich Fury / Getty Images)

“I’ll never forget the look of terror on people’s faces,” one shared.

Meanwhile, Fox News also confirmed on Sunday that Texas attorney Thomas J. Henry also filed a lawsuit against Scott – whose real name is Jacques Bermon Webster – as well as Drake, whose real name is Aubrey Drake Graham. The suit also named Live Nation and NRG Stadium. 

TRAVIS SCOTT’S ASTROWORLD TRAGEDY: FUNERAL HELD FOR 16-YEAR-OLD VICTIM OF DEADLY CROWD SURGE

Despite the fact the plaintiffs in Buzbee’s complaint were offered full refunds for the costs associated with the concert, the litigator said the gesture isn’t nearly enough restitution.

“Such [an] offer is a transparent and grotesque effort of the Defendants to limit their liability, after the fact, to the families of those killed or injured,” he writes in the court admonishment. “These Defendants will no doubt argue that their exposure is limited to the price of the ticket, and, failing that, will attempt to force all concertgoers—regardless of their age or adequate notice—into binding arbitration, so a jury trial can be avoided.”

Travis Scott is said to be in a ‘constant stake of shock’ following the tragedy at Astroworld 2021 in Houston. (Photo by Erika Goldring/WireImage / Getty Images)

Live Nation told Fox Business in a statement: “We continue to support and assist local authorities in their ongoing investigation so that both the fans who attended and their families can get the answers they want and deserve, and we will address all legal matters at the appropriate time.”

The lawsuit also points to Scott’s history of inciting rowdiness at many of his shows in the past and includes screenshots of social media posts from Scott throughout the years in which he shows concertgoers bloodied, passed out and allegedly with broken bones from their time at his shows.

“Webster’s affinity for the storming of barricades and ignoring security measures appears to border on an obsession at times,” the Buzbee complaint reads. “Reports from multiple shows, including Astroworld 2021, describe ticketless fans waiting outside the venues for the ‘signal’ from Webster.”

GET FOX BUSINESS ON THE GO BY CLICKING HERE

“These fans are either to sneak into the show by climbing over or around whatever fencing may be in place or are to use mob force to knock down barriers,” the paragraph continues, referencing a since-deleted tweet from Scott shortly after the festival sold out that allegedly read, “…WE STILL SNEAKING THE WILD ONES IN. !!!!!”

Last week, a rep for Scott told Fox News Digital in a statement that he is still “actively exploring routes of connection” with families affected by the tragedy.

“Over the last week, Travis Scott and his team have been actively exploring routes of connection with each and every family affected by the tragedy through the appropriate liaisons,” the statement read.

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE ON FOX BUSINESS

“He is distraught by the situation and desperately wishes to share his condolences and provide aid to them as soon as possible, but wants to remain respectful of each family’s wishes on how they’d best like to be connected,” it continued.

“To those families who would like to reach out directly to his team, please send an email to the below address where we will have a team on hand to assist,” the statement noted before adding the address, [email protected]  

Reps for Scott, Drake and Apple did not immediately respond to Fox Business’ requests for comment.

Leave a Comment

Advertise