Temperatures hit 30C in London – as heavy rain hits Wales, Scotland and northern England 

Temperatures could reach 30C in London today as heavy rain drenches large parts of Wales, Scotland and northern England. 

In a tale of two halves, isolated areas of central London, the south east and East Anglia could all see scorching temperatures, while more northern parts of the country saw some much-needed rain after the driest July on record.

Meteorologists have said today will be warm and humid, with rain becoming confined to western hills and coasts, with a large area of rain over South Wales, while the brighter skies are in the east of the country. 

According to the Met Office, areas that don’t see any rain today might have to wait to quench their thirst, with the mercury set to soar once again to reach the 30C-mark on Wednesday. 

The hotter-than-normal start to August is being driven by  the Azores High pressure system – this concentration of warm air normally sits off the coats of Spain, but has grown larger and is now being pushed northwards. 

A spokesperson for the Met Office told MailOnline today: ‘There is a chance of 30C in isolated areas, but for the most part it will be around 28C or 29C today. 

Paddle boarders make their way into the sea at Bournemouth beach following  busy day during the July heatwave.  The dry weather that was common throughout most of the UK last month is set to continue

A combine harvester works in a field near Newchurch on the Romney Marsh in Kent today. Parts of the UK saw almost no rainfall in July

A combine harvester works in a field near Newchurch on the Romney Marsh in Kent today. Parts of the UK saw almost no rainfall in July

Forecasters are predicting dry weather with isolated showers in some northern parts of England and Scotland over the next few days

Forecasters are predicting dry weather with isolated showers in some northern parts of England and Scotland over the next few days

The Met Office has confirmed this summer has been the most arid on record for East Anglia, the south east and southern England

The Met Office has confirmed this summer has been the most arid on record for East Anglia, the south east and southern England

While southern England saw a continuation of last month's dry weather, the north of the country has seen a return to more traditional British summer weather. The covers remained in place as rain delayed the start of play between Lancashire Lightning and Essex Eagles at Sedergh, Lancashire, today

While southern England saw a continuation of last month’s dry weather, the north of the country has seen a return to more traditional British summer weather. The covers remained in place as rain delayed the start of play between Lancashire Lightning and Essex Eagles at Sedergh, Lancashire, today

The covers remain on and spectators stay under the umbrellas at the cricket in Sedbergh, Lancashire, today. It comes as rain sweeps across northern England, Wales and Scotland

The covers remain on and spectators stay under the umbrellas at the cricket in Sedbergh, Lancashire, today. It comes as rain sweeps across northern England, Wales and Scotland

‘The headline temperatures for tomorrow are 30C in central London, the south east and East Anglia. More widely across the UK it will be closer to average temperatures.’

‘Thursday will have a cool start, but that will turn to sun as the day progresses. There will be sunny spells for much of the south of England and Wales. 

‘It will be a largely sunny day with temperatures above average for this time of year for many.’

The Met Office says Friday will see temperatures return to a level more typical for the start of August at around 25C, though conditions will remain ‘clear and sunny for most’.

A spokesperson added: ‘Into the weekend, the high pressure system will continue to move over the south west, bringing sun and clear skies. 

‘It is a similar story on Sunday, with a largely clear setting and temperatures in the mid-20s.’

While parts of Scotland, the west of England and Northern Ireland have chances of rainfall over the coming days, much of the UK ‘won’t see much’.

It comes after the Met Office confirmed July to be the driest in the country since 1935 and the most arid on record for East Anglia, the south east and southern England. 

High pressure pushed rain into the north west, allowing temperatures to build elsewhere.

The UK saw just 56 per cent (46.3mm) of its average rainfall for July, while England alone has just 35 per cent.

Dr Mark McCarthy of the National Climate Information Centre said: ‘July 2022 has been a significantly dry month for Southern England, only 10.5mm of rain has been provisionally recorded on average, less than the previous record of 10.9mm set in 1911. 

Parched ground is visible at Llwyn Onn reservoir in Merthyr Tydfil, South Wales, over the weekend, as water levels drop after a month of predominantly dry weather

Parched ground is visible at Llwyn Onn reservoir in Merthyr Tydfil, South Wales, over the weekend, as water levels drop after a month of predominantly dry weather

Bewl Water reservoir in Lamberhurst, Kent, sits much lower than normal after the most arid summer on record in south east England

Bewl Water reservoir in Lamberhurst, Kent, sits much lower than normal after the most arid summer on record in south east England

The dry weather, which looks set to continue in the south east, has led to tinderbox conditions, with officials and firefighters warning people to be careful not to cause wildfires

The dry weather, which looks set to continue in the south east, has led to tinderbox conditions, with officials and firefighters warning people to be careful not to cause wildfires

‘The dominant weather pattern for the month has only allowed interludes of rain into northern areas of the UK, with areas further south largely getting any rainfall from isolated and fleeting showers in a month that will ultimately be remembered for extreme heat.’

On July 19, the UK also experience its hottest ever day as temperatures soared past 40C for the first time ever.

The mercury hit an unprecedented 40.2C (104.4F) at Heathrow Airport, beating the previous all-time UK high of 38.7C (101.7F) in Cambridge in July 2019. 

The extreme heat was caused by a plume of hot air from north Africa and the Sahara and an ‘Azores High’ subtropical pressure system creeping further north than usual – which experts say is a result of climate change.

Forecasters also confirmed that the previous night was the warmest on record in Britain, with temperatures not falling below 25C (77F) in many areas of England and Wales. 

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